Special Projects

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Special Projects

  • Greenhouse Program for Women Filmmakers

    At the begining of 2014 we decided to replicate the hugely successful Greenhouse model within Israel through an innovative new program targeting Jewish and Arab women documentary filmmakers. At a time when intolerance and discrimination are unfortunately on the rise, there is an urgent need to foster mutual understanding and build bridges between the Jewish and Arab communities. We have chosen to focus on women filmmakers because women in Israel still face significant social and economic barriers to becoming successful documentary film directors and producers, especially women from vulnerable and marginalized groups.

    The program brings together 12 talented female filmmakers from diverse religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and supports them in the development of compelling documentaries that amplify women’s voices about important contemporary and social issues.  The one-year program includes three 5-day residential workshops spanning a period of eight months.

    The participating Jewish and Arab filmmakers are  enriched by the cross-cultural dialogue, cooperation and community-building fostered through the program, which profoundly influences their work. Each of the participants  receives individual and continuing support from one of three dedicated mentors who are themselves leading figures in the field of documentary filmmaking in Israel. The workshops  enable the filmmakers to deepen their understanding and respect for each other and build bridges among women filmmakers committed to peace and social change.

    The program was launched in early 2014 and 12 filmmakers from all over Israel and ended in Januray 2015.  The filmmakers who participated in the first round are: Ayelet Albenda | Esti Almo Wexler | Jane Bibi | Carmen Elmakiyes-Amos |Orit Fouks | Gitit Ginat | Samah Haik | Oshri Hayun | Moran Ifergan | Marwa Jbara Tibi |Talia Krevsky | Alamork Marsha |

    The second round was launched in February 2015 and 12 filmmakers graduated the program in early 2016: Anat Vovnoboy | Orit Ronell | Yosra Abu Kaf | Samah Salaime Egbariya | Yehudit Kahana |  Racheli Vasserman | Rajaa Ghanem ElDanef and Helen Zananiri | Ekaterina Diakova | Liat Mer | Yael Gur | Ilanit Swissa

    The third round was launched in March 2016 with 13 filmmakers selected to participate: Rozeen Bsharat | Samah Bsoul | Hadass Dissen | Odeya Geuliov | Lydia Ginzburg | Meirav Haddad | Tzipi Huri | EIfat Makbi | Adva Ofir | Bruria Pasternak | Tehila Ra’anan Frenkel | Irit Shravit | Samah Wattad

     

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  • Greenhouse Program – Middle East and North Africa

    Now in its ninth year, the Greenhouse Development Program for Documentary Filmmakers from the Middle East and North Africa is a groundbreaking initiative positioned at the intersection of cinema, social change and peace-building. The program seeks to nurture a diverse community of documentary filmmakers from across the Middle East, committed to dialogue and possessing the necessary skills to create powerful films.

     

    Since its inception, Greenhouse has trained more than 130 filmmakers from the region, empowering them to use film as a catalyst for creating more open and just societies. Greenhouse films, such as On the Way to School, A Film Unfinished, Dolphin Boy and the Academy-Award nominated 5 Broken Cameras, explore a rich diversity of social issues.  24 Greenhouse films have been completed to date, and most of them have premiered and won awards at prestigious film festivals throughout the world.

    The first-ever retrospective of Greenhouse films will take place in early May 2015 at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville NY.

     

  • Supporting Haredi Filmmakers Program

    NFCT’s Supporting Haredi Filmmakers Program nurtures filmmakers from the ultra-Orthodox community. Through this program, we provide professional mentorship and financial support to Haredi filmmakers to enable them to cinematically explore the unique issues and stories of their communities. We are currently supporting the development of a documentary film by a Haredi woman filmmaker exploring the meaning and symbolism of the various kinds of wigs worn by Haredi women. We are also supporting the development of a film about a rebellious young Haredi girl and her family’s struggle to cope with her becoming less religious.

     

  • Business Card Program – Nurturing New Talent

    Launched in 2006, the NFCT’s Business Card Program for Emerging Filmmakers is a leading initiative designed to nurture new talent in documentary filmmaking in Israel.  The program offers personalized mentorship and resources for promising film school graduates looking to develop their film projects and successfully integrate into the film industry. Hundreds of films have been developed through the program, many of which have gone on to win awards and garner widespread acclaim.  Two recent examples of outstanding films that were developed through the Business Card program are Home Movie, which won the Best Documentary Award at Docaviv in 2012, and Life in Stills, which won the Ophir Prize for Best Documentary in 2012. 

  • The Next Generation

    The Next Generation is an innovative program run by the NFCT in partnership with the Second Authority for Television and Radio and the Docaviv International Documentary Film Festival. Through this program, we support the production of short and compelling documentary films (25 minutes) that target young audiences. The selected films explore and give expression to the various feelings, problems, challenges and concerns facing adolescents growing up in Israel today.  Once the films are completed, they premiere at the Docaviv International Film Festival and are also broadcast on Israel’s Channel 2.

  • Environmental Film Program

    In partnership with the Ministry of the Environment and Yes Docu, the NFCT is supporting the development and production of documentaries that explore the issue of the culture of consumerism. This theme is of utmost relevance in today’s Israel, which is increasingly characterized by consumerism and a lack of awareness of the need to build toward a more sustainable society. 

  • Holocaust Historical Preservation Film Program

    Today we confront an alarming escalation in anti-Semitism and racism in Europe, as well as genocide and threats of genocide in other parts of the world. The NFCT is committed to harnessing the power of cinema to enhance knowledge and understanding of the unprecedented tragedy of the Holocaust to ensure that the memory of those who suffered is preserved across time, and to encourage individuals of all backgrounds and ages to reflect on the important lessons to be learned for today. As the final generation of Holocaust survivors and eyewitnesses dwindles, we believe that that we must do whatever we can to capture, preserve, and circulate their stories to ensure that the powerful message behind their legacy never disappears.

     

    The Holocaust Historical Preservation Film Program is an important project run by the NFCT, through which we support new documentaries related to the Holocaust. In addition to financial support, the program provides the selected filmmaker(s) with ongoing professional support from the NFCT’s team, including experienced and renowned documentary filmmakers.

     

    Dozens of films within our portfolio explore themes and stories related to the Holocaust, illustrating the NFCT’s impressive track record of facilitating the production of truly outstanding and memorable films that commemorate the Holocaust. A selection of these award-winning films include The Flat (2011), by Arnon Goldfinger; Six Million and One (2011) by David Fisher; Hitler’s Children (2011), by Chanoch Ze’evi; and A Film Unfinished (2010), by Yael Hersonski.

    The Flat

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